Kuumba

The sixth principle of Kwanzaa is Kuumba (pronounced koo-oom-bah; it’s really fun to say), and it means creativity. That’s pretty self explanatory, so I won’t go into too much more detail. This year, I’ve been really creative!

I’m in board games club at school, and a few weeks into the school year, our teacher announced a board-game making competition. I knew that I wanted to be in it, but I didn’t know what I wanted to do. Then, one of my classmates, Stephen, asked me if I’d help him with his board game, and I said yes, which turned out to be a great move.

He’d already come up with a super innovative premise for the game (it’s called Doopley Dap) and it goes a little something like this. (He wrote the original premise, I added my own special touch to it.)

In the year 3116, animal intelligence has reached an all-time high. 3116 was the year of the Great Animal Revolution. Not much is known about the war. The game takes place in the year 4124, where animals govern the world. The human population has decreased to around 105,000. The animals renamed the earth Doopley Dap. From 3524 to 4024, the sky kingdom, ruled by King Pugsly, was the biggest and most wealthy kingdom. In 4024, the people in the sky grew tired of being too far away from the other countries, and immigrated to other lands. King Pugsly became depressed from having no company, so he decided he’d throw a dinner party, inviting the presidents of England, Spain, Ireland, and France. The only catch is, once you’re invited, you can’t leave. Now it’s up to you to figure out how this dinner party ends: will the guests manage to escape? Or will the hosts manage to entrap the guests forever?” 

Sounds absolutely amazing, right?  It is, and it’s also super complex. There’s three of us in the group making the game: me, Stephen, and his friend Jace (Mortal Instruments fans, you see what I did there?) and each of us bring our own creative aspect to the game.

Jace had to come up with 100 silly things for the players to do, I made the video advertisement and typed the instructions, and Stephen designed the board. We’re so close to being finished, and when we are, the eighth grade teachers are going to play it. Here’s to more creativity in 2017.

*Note: although Stephen did the primary designs for the board, that’s not his arm in the picture. It’s Jace’s.