The Declaration of Independence: Loyalists vs. Patriots

We all know the Declaration of Independence, and we all probably view it as a great document: after all, it’s how Americans declared their freedom from the British. We have an idea of how the Patriots might have viewed it, but have we ever really thought about how the Loyalists might have viewed it? (Aside from, you know, being generally upset about it). Let’s take a brief look at both perspectives.)

For an additional look at how differently the Patriots and Loyalists thought (and outside of a Declaration of Independence standpoint), I would recommend listening to “Farmer Refuted” from Hamilton.

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The Loyalist Perspective:

A loyalist is defined as a colonist of the American revolutionary period who supported the British cause. Most of the colonists of that time period kind of had an iffy relationship with the British. This was due to things such as the murder/mistreatment of colonists by British soldiers and taxation without representation. The colonists had 27 total complaints, all of which were documented in the Declaration of Independence.

Initially, the Loyalists would’ve viewed the Declaration of Independence as blasphemous. They would’ve been offended as well, due to the lengthy list of complaints the colonists had. Even if they didn’t agree with every single thing the British did, they wouldn’t have openly complained about it. They respected the British rule, and they didn’t really have any reason not to respect them. They also might’ve agreed with the statement that all men are created equal…they just would’ve thought that they’re already equal under the British rule.

After the Declaration of Independence, the Loyalists might’ve anticipated an uproar for sure. Some of them might’ve anticipated protests, and some might’ve anticipated war.

However, I don’t think anyone anticipated their precious Britain losing control over the colonies.

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The Patriot Perspective: 

Patriots are defined as colonists who rebelled against the British rule. The Patriots are the colonists I described above, the ones that had an iffy relationship with the British. They didn’t like all the ridiculous taxes and acts the British imposed on them. They didn’t like the ways that the British soldiers had treated the colonists. They are the ones responsible for the Declaration of Independence.

A Patriot would’ve viewed the Declaration of Independence as empowering. It probably would’ve felt great to tell King George off, and  in a classy way. (Think about it: they could’ve just said “Hey, we hate you and we don’t want to be a part of your country” and they could’ve been really childish about it. Instead, they went the classy route and laid out all their complaints and principles. But I’m going on a bit of a tangent here.)  They probably would’ve thought it was great that King George finally knew how they’d felt under his rule, and they would’ve felt liberated because of it.

After the Declaration of Independence, the Patriots had to have known that this wasn’t going to pass quietly. They had to have known that there would’ve been a lot of protests, especially from the Loyalist side. They might’ve even anticipated a war.

And, since I’m assuming they were bound to be more than just a little cocky after the Declaration of Independence, they probably thought that if there was a war, they would win.

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14 On the 14th!

First of all, before I start anything, let me just say that it is so cool to be turning fourteen on January 14.

Second of all, I had one of the greatest birthdays I’ve ever had today! (Which is why I’m publishing this so late.) So before we get into the checklist, let me tell you how my amazing day went.

I woke up a little earlier to get ready for my assessment for the performing arts school and to continue watching A Series of Unfortunate Events on Netflix. (As of the time I’m writing this episode, I’m on episode 6: “The Wide Window: Part Two” and it is so good. I love it!) .  We left for the assessment (which was at 11) around 10:20. I was really nervous, but in the end, I think I did great. I was one of three assessors (and we were all one the creative writing track) and out of the three of us, I finished last, with less than four minutes to spare. I’m feeling pretty confident about the assessment. We’ll see what happens at the end of February!

After that, I only had an hour to spare before my birthday twin (remember Magnus from my Ujamaa post? That’s him) had his birthday party. My mom and I looked at tile and flooring for the basement (and I saw this wonderful purple bathroom that I’m absolutely in love with) and then we stopped by CVS.

Before I knew it, it was time for the party, which was loads of fun! We watched (part of) a movie, played games (including a very weird round of Paranoia), and danced to little kid music and Ed Sheeran. I also realized, at one point during the party, that one of my friends had nabbed my phone and taken over two hundred pictures with it!

After the party, my mom and I went to see Hidden Figures (not Hidden Fences!!), which was so good I can’t even begin to describe it. If you haven’t seen it, you need to! It’s equal parts funny and educational, and the cast is amazing. (And I’m not just saying it because one of the actresses was on Twisted.) Also, it was really inspiring and it was so engaging! If it were a book, I wouldn’t have been able to put it down!

After the movie, we popped by Barnes and Noble to get some books. I finally got my own copies of the entirety of The Infernal Devices trilogy. After Barnes and Noble, my mom and I went to Olive Garden for dinner, and we had a lot of fun. (And pasta. I’m still full!).

Then we got back home, and I finally was able to charge my phone and respond to all the birthday messages I’d gotten throughout the day (my phone had died earlier in the day). Now I’m sitting here writing about my day, and thinking up 14 things I want to do this year. To refresh your memory, here’s the list I made last year, and I’ve checked off all the things I’ve done.

1. Finish the novel I’m writing with a friend. ✓ (Did this, I’m just not really friends with the person I’d started it with. 

2. Try to stay on the honor roll. (Fingers crossed for distinguished honors!) 

3. Try finishing every single anime in my list. That’s going to be a very fun challenge. (I tried. But failed. Maybe this year).

4. Find yet another book series, this time without a cliché protagonist. ✓ (The Amateurs: check it out!” 

5. Instead of trying to make my way through an entire play, maybe just read more of Shakespeare’s sonnets. I actually like the ones we’ve read in school. ✓ (I’ve read a few since then.)  

6. Say, “Sorry, I’m Jewish,” the next time someone says Merry Christmas to me. Just to see how they would react. (Sadly, no. Thought about it though.)

7. I’m going to go small scale again and say finish two stories. 

8. Tell my English teacher that a short story is no less than 20,000 words, and mine was only about 6, 350 words. Who cares if it was over twenty pages? Double spacing it did not help. 

9. Or I could just write an actual four page short story. Challenge accepted!!! 

10. Read more Stephen King and Nicholas Sparks. ✓ (Kind of. Stephen King? Yes. Nicholas Sparks. Not so much). 

11. Become a better artist. By that, I mean make my Impossible Task a little less impossible. 

12. Learn to play an instrument! ✓ (I’m playing the clarinet in the school band this year, although I didn’t actually ask to do that. But even though it was a mistake, I’m kind of glad about it.) 

13. Actually do all of the things on this list! (All except two!)

14 Things I Wish To Do While I’m 14

  1. Finish editing the book I wrote last year!
  2. Finish writing the second book in that series.
  3. Instead of just playing concert music, I want to learn a song from a movie score and play that. (We’re playing the Captain America theme song for the spring concert, but that doesn’t count).
  4. Maybe this year I’ll start reading an already published book series so that I don’t have to wait for the next book to come out!
  5. If I get into the performing arts school, I want to make the volleyball team for the charter school that shares the building with them. If I don’t and I stay in IB (or end up at the science school) I’d like to make the volleyball teams for those respective schools.
  6. Reread all of the A Series of Unfortunate Events books. I didn’t get a chance to do so before the show came out (since I don’t own all of them) but rereading them would be a nice flashback to my childhood.
  7. Try writing something new: not a short story, but a poem or screenplay, some form of writing I’m not as familiar with.
  8. Try to get comfortable with writing limits, although this seems pretty impossible. We have a four-paragraph essay due on Monday, and we asked our teacher if we could go over just a little…and she said no. So maybe I’ll just have to get used to those limits.
  9. Rock my first day of the ninth grade!
  10. Start working more puns into casual conversation (and into my writing).
  11. Join the Girls Who Code club at my school next semester, and learning the basics of HTML and CSS.
  12. Finish the board game I’m helping Stephen with. (And get our teachers to play it)
  13. Win the mock trial we’re doing in Social Studies! It’s about Captain Preston’s role in the Boston Massacre, and I’m the prosecutor. The defense lawyer is really intense, but I still have faith in us! I’m going to spend the next few days studying all of Barba’s best trials for inspiration.
  14. Last but not least, I’d like to keep my old friends (forever and ever!), but since high school seems to be separating us, I’d also like to make sure that I make new ones as well. I want to enjoy high school as best as I can, even if I don’t end up where my friends are.

Imani

The seventh and final principle of Kwanzaa is imani, which means faith. It can mean faith in others, but more than that, it means to have faith in yourself. I believe that you should have faith in yourself no matter what, and this year, I had to have a lot of it.

This year was my first year playing team sports since the second grade. Back then, I played soccer, and now I play volleyball. It can be really nerve-racking before a game because I’d always worry that something would go wrong, and I’d screw up.

In order to combat that, I had to have a lot of faith in myself. Faith that we’d win, faith that I would do my best, and faith in the team, especially. I even had to have faith in the refs, even though (and I mean this nicely) some of them don’t know what the heck they’re doing. But that’s a rant for later.

Anyway, this hasn’t happened yet, but I’m going to need to have faith in myself for the performing arts school audition. At the moment I do, but let’s just see how I feel five minutes before the assesment.  But I’ve still got time for that.

Everyone, I hope that you have a lovely 2017, and remember to always have faith in yourself and others.

 

Kuumba

The sixth principle of Kwanzaa is Kuumba (pronounced koo-oom-bah; it’s really fun to say), and it means creativity. That’s pretty self explanatory, so I won’t go into too much more detail. This year, I’ve been really creative!

I’m in board games club at school, and a few weeks into the school year, our teacher announced a board-game making competition. I knew that I wanted to be in it, but I didn’t know what I wanted to do. Then, one of my classmates, Stephen, asked me if I’d help him with his board game, and I said yes, which turned out to be a great move.

He’d already come up with a super innovative premise for the game (it’s called Doopley Dap) and it goes a little something like this. (He wrote the original premise, I added my own special touch to it.)

In the year 3116, animal intelligence has reached an all-time high. 3116 was the year of the Great Animal Revolution. Not much is known about the war. The game takes place in the year 4124, where animals govern the world. The human population has decreased to around 105,000. The animals renamed the earth Doopley Dap. From 3524 to 4024, the sky kingdom, ruled by King Pugsly, was the biggest and most wealthy kingdom. In 4024, the people in the sky grew tired of being too far away from the other countries, and immigrated to other lands. King Pugsly became depressed from having no company, so he decided he’d throw a dinner party, inviting the presidents of England, Spain, Ireland, and France. The only catch is, once you’re invited, you can’t leave. Now it’s up to you to figure out how this dinner party ends: will the guests manage to escape? Or will the hosts manage to entrap the guests forever?” 

Sounds absolutely amazing, right?  It is, and it’s also super complex. There’s three of us in the group making the game: me, Stephen, and his friend Jace (Mortal Instruments fans, you see what I did there?) and each of us bring our own creative aspect to the game.

Jace had to come up with 100 silly things for the players to do, I made the video advertisement and typed the instructions, and Stephen designed the board. We’re so close to being finished, and when we are, the eighth grade teachers are going to play it. Here’s to more creativity in 2017.

*Note: although Stephen did the primary designs for the board, that’s not his arm in the picture. It’s Jace’s.

Nia

The fifth principle of Kwanzaa is nia. Nia means purpose, and specifically it means to look inside yourself and set personal goals. As a Capricorn, I’m very ambitious, and I like to set goals for myself, as you’ve likely noticed, with my checklists of things to do in certain years (I’ve got a lot I want to do while I’m fourteen!). I think that one of my purposes is to write, and here are three goals I’m going to set for myself to fulfill that purpose in 2017.

  1. Do well on my assessment for the performing arts school. (I’d be majoring in digital communication arts, which encompasses writing, photography, cinematography, etc.). If I don’t get in, that’s fine. But I want to do my best.
  2. Finish editing Three. Three is a story I started writing at the beginning of last school year, and I actually finished it last year, too. I’d like it to be the first in a trilogy called The Countdown, but there are still some rough patches (especially in the beginning of the novel) and plot holes I need to address, and I’d like to be done with those.
  3. Start journaling consistently. I do keep a journal, but I tend to only journal when something monumental happens, and even then, sometimes I just write about it here. Next year, I’d like to start doing it more often. I’ll start with three or four times a week, and then we’ll go from there.

Ujamaa

The fourth principle of Kwanzaa is ujamaa (pronounced oo-jah-mah). Ujamaa means cooperative economics, or supporting each other. Now, I don’t have much experience with cooperative economics, per se, but I do have some experience with supporting each other. Specifically, supporting my friends.

At school, I mainly hang out with my two best friends. We’ll call them Magnus and Isabelle (after two of my favorite characters from The Mortal Instruments). Since there’s only three of us in our group, we’re pretty close, and we’ll stand up for each other no matter what. Since we have a small, relatively drama-free school, there aren’t always many opportunities for that, and there haven’t been very many this year. There was the time where Isabelle mentioned that there were some guys in her class giving her trouble, and Magnus and I wanted to put a stop to it.

She wouldn’t let us, saying that she’d gotten her sister (who’s in high school) to do something, but even though she wouldn’t let us confront them for her, we were still there for her. We told her that if she ever changed her mind, we’d be ready to fight. (Sadly, she did not.) But even though she didn’t, we still supported her, because she’s our best friend, and we’d do anything to help us. That goes for any of my friends or family,

 

Ujima

Ujima, the third principle of Kwanzaa (pronounced u-jee-ma), means to work together, or collective work and responsibility. Being in middle school, I do a lot of group work and group projects, and I’ve currently been working on one since Halloween or so.

In my design class, I (along with six other girls in my class) am building a tiny house. Not a scale of a tiny house, like we did last year, but an actual tiny house, that has to be six feet tall and six feet tall. Ours is a PVC pipe yurt, and technically 72.5 inches, but our teacher’s letting us slide after seeing how worked up we got about it. It is only a half-inch, after all.

But in order for a project this big to work, each group member has to carry their weight. (Not that everyone is doing that, which is creating tension within our group.) So, at the beginning of the project, we made a role system so that we’d complete everything. Each of the six girls–we’ll call them Adele (that’s me!), Chanel, Emilie, Gabrielle, Holly, and Mai–has a job they have to complete in order to complete the yurt by the due date (January 26th). Four of the six girls are doing their jobs and more for the group. The other two…well, they’re working on it, I assume. The jobs are as follows:

Holly and Adele: Tarp/Frame (This refers to the construction of the frame and measurement and securing of the tarp. I also have the added responsibility of keeping up with our isometric drawings, since no one else is willing to take them.)

Gabrielle: Roof (She’s in charge of the roof designs and oversees the construction).

Mai: Floor (She’s in charge of the floor designs, if we do decide to build one. Jury’s still out on that one.)

Emilie and Chanel: Interior Design (They’re supposed to be building furniture. We’ve yet to see a piece of completed furniture, but that’s a rant for another time.)

Those are our main jobs, but we often make plans for the construction day based on what needs to get done and how we need to do it. Also, constructing the frame was a three-person job, so we enlisted Emilie to help with that. Even putting up the tarp and securing it requires at least four people. (There are three separate pieces to the tarp.)

This project is almost completed, but we wouldn’t have gotten it done if we didn’t have these specific roles, because if we didn’t, we’d all be stepping on each other’s toes trying to get things done. That still happens sometimes, but thanks to these roles and responsibilities, it doesn’t happen often, and it’s looking like we’ll finish the project ahead of deadline. Well, the outside and frame. Can’t say anything about the furniture.